Stock broker uk jobs


They keep a finger on the pulse of the financial market, researching stock and shares and keeping up to date with all the latest financial news. They put all these factors into speculating the ripe time to buy or sell a share, making their money through the brokerage they get after every transaction is made.

Stockbrokers try to build up and maintain a healthy roster of clients: Portfolio management plays a big part in this, assessing the needs and risk-taking abilities of the client and matching it with the right type of stocks and shares.

Consequently, stockbroking is very much a sales role, in that they have to convince new clients to entrust them with their funds and assets. In between all the buying and selling, a good stockbroker spends plenty of time marketing themselves and networking their socks off to get new clients.

The salary is a big draw to the profession. Life as a stockbroker is no easy walk in the park. It can be extremely pressurised, stressful and draining. The hours, in particular, are very long.

The London Stock Exchange opens at 8am so most stockbrokers will be at their desks at 7am and stay until about 6pm. There are no strict academic requirements to become a stockbroker, but most employers will be looking for those with a degree. This can be in any subject, but a degree in economics, business or finance might put those wishing to enter the profession at an advantage. They keep a finger on the pulse of the financial market, researching stock and shares and keeping up to date with all the latest financial news.

They put all these factors into speculating the ripe time to buy or sell a share, making their money through the brokerage they get after every transaction is made. Stockbrokers try to build up and maintain a healthy roster of clients: Portfolio management plays a big part in this, assessing the needs and risk-taking abilities of the client and matching it with the right type of stocks and shares.

Consequently, stockbroking is very much a sales role, in that they have to convince new clients to entrust them with their funds and assets.

In between all the buying and selling, a good stockbroker spends plenty of time marketing themselves and networking their socks off to get new clients. The salary is a big draw to the profession. Life as a stockbroker is no easy walk in the park. It can be extremely pressurised, stressful and draining.

The hours, in particular, are very long. The London Stock Exchange opens at 8am so most stockbrokers will be at their desks at 7am and stay until about 6pm. There are no strict academic requirements to become a stockbroker, but most employers will be looking for those with a degree. This can be in any subject, but a degree in economics, business or finance might put those wishing to enter the profession at an advantage.